Portrait Head of a Young Prince, Called Romulus Augustulus, on an Unrelated Antique Bust

Portrait Head of a Young Prince, Called Romulus Augustulus, on an Unrelated Antique Bust

The portrait of a young prince is placed on an ancient unrelated bust with lion skin. In the Torlonia Museum catalog, the work was identified as a portrait of Romulus Augustulus, son of Maxentius, coming precisely from the circus on the Via Appia. The particular hairstyle was subject of study, in fact it recalls a type of hairstyle in vogue in late antiquity, which can bring the portrait closer to an identification with a prince of the Constantinian family, such as the born in the purple son Constantine II or Constant II. The fringe is compact on the forehead, the locks are well rendered and full, separated in the center of the forehead and longer on the cheekbones and on the nape. It is therefore possible to assert that the portrait depicts a young prince, as denoted by the oak crown surrounding his head.

Inventory: MT 612

Material: White marble

Technique: Work sculpted through the use of: chisels (also square-tipped and toothed) rasps

Dating: Imperial age

Origin: Giustiniani Collection

Portrait Head of a Young Prince, Called Romulus Augustulus, on an Unrelated Antique Bust

Portrait Head of a Young Prince, Called Romulus Augustulus, on an Unrelated Antique Bust

Portrait Head of a Young Prince, Called Romulus Augustulus, on an Unrelated Antique Bust

Portrait Head of a Young Prince, Called Romulus Augustulus, on an Unrelated Antique Bust